Tag Archives: optical cable

12 cores Ribbon Indoor Flat Fiber Optic Cable

12 cores Ribbon Indoor Flat Fiber Optic Cable:

pdf.gif 12 cores Ribbon Indoor Flat Fiber Optic Cable Specification

Description:
Fiber count: 12
Optical fiber ribbon Color:
blue/orange/green/brown/grey/white/red/black/yellow/purple/pink/aqua
Aramid yarn
Outer jacket material
PVC/LSZH
Thickness: 0.5±0.1mm

Requirements:

Appearance Slickness, without bumps
Package Wooden drum
Length Not less than 1000M, nearly the same length per drum and other length
upon negotiation.
Test report Attached with OTDR test report,qualified certificate label the style of fiber.

 

Fiber property:

Fiber type Unit Single mode
fiber G652B
Multimode
fiber50/125
Multimode
fiber62.5/125
Multimode
OM3 300
Condition nm 1310/1550 850/1300 850/1300 850/1300
Attenuation dB/km 0.40/0.30 3.5/1.5 3.5/1.5 3.5/1.5
Dispersion 1550nm ps(nm·km) ≤18 —– —– —–
1625nm ps(nm·km) ≤22 —– —– —–
Bandwidth 850nm MHZ·.km —– ≥200 ≥160 ≥1500
1300nm MHZ.  ·km —– ≥200 ≥200 ≥500

Technical Specification:

Fiber Count Dimension Nominal weight Min.Bending Radius Max. Tension(N)
(mm) (kg/km) (mm) Short-term Long-term
Width Height Dynamic Static
4 3.1±0.3 2.5±0.3 10 60 30 150 80
6 3.2±0.3 2.5±0.3 11
5 3.6±0.3 2.5±0.3 13
12 4.2±0.3 2.5±0.3 15

What problems occurs when the transportation and installation of fiber optic cable

Fiber optic cable products is very fragile thing, need to be more specific protection, therefore, fiber optic cable in the transport, laying and installation process should note the following:

  • With the cable tray cable tray should be marked on the side surface direction scroll, scroll, from not too long, usually not more than 20 meters, rolling should be taken to avoid damage to barrier packaging board.
  • Cable should be used forklifts and other handling lifting equipment or special stage, non-optical disc directly from the car rolling or throwing.
  • Prohibited the cable tray with cable or flat stacked, the cable tray in the car need to be fortified wood.
  • Cable should not be set back several times, so the integrity of the internal structure of fiber optic cable, fiber optic cable laying should be carried out before the appearance of inspections and check specifications, quantity, length and attenuation test inspection and acceptance of a single plate, each plate with cable in nursing board with factory test certificate (should be properly kept for future reference), when the demolition of cable shield to guard against damage to the cable.
  • In the construction process should be noted that fiber optic cable bend radius not less than construction requirements, fiber optic cable does not allow excessive bending.
  • Laying overhead cables, through pulley traction, overhead cable to avoid buildings, trees and other facilities friction, avoid sharp mopping the floor or other hard objects with friction and damage to cable sheath, as necessary, installation of protective measures. After the pulley is strictly prohibited forced out of the traction cable, fiber optic cable has been crushed to prevent damage.
  • In the design of optical cable and then the building should be easy to find as much as possible to avoid, such as can not be avoided, cable fire protection measures should be taken.
  • In the relatively long section of cable laying construction, for back plate, cables must comply with Doon “8” dial up. It completely twisted cable status.
  • Fiber Optic Cable box selection must meet the standards of qualified YD/T814-1996 connector box to ensure fiber in the connector box of the radius of curvature of not less than 37.5MM, fiber remaining in the joint box length is not less than 1.6M, cable reinforcements firmly fixed in the connector box, cable and connector box does not occur between the twist, the joint box sealing performance, can prevent moisture from entering.
  • In the splice, the joint bi-directional OTDR attenuation should be based on the average test subject
  • Fiber optic cable laying completed, if not promptly follow treatment, fiber optic cable ends should be sealed to prevent moisture against the fiber.
  • In the splice, if not continue down several times, and then follow a recommended cut off (due to construction of the cable ends may be subject to mechanical damage).
  • Splice completed, should be set aside in the amount of cable connector box at both ends of the cable, and more than a solid plate in the cable rack.
  • Cable network project in one of the important role, not yet come in handy if there are problems before, resulting in economic losses can not be ignored, so the main points of the content of this article we want to focus, to avoid losses and waste.

Fiber Optic Cable Plant Link Loss Budget Analysis

Loss budget analysis is the calculation and verification of a fiber optic system’s operating characteristics. This encompasses items such as routing, electronics, wavelengths, fiber type, and circuit length. Attenuation and bandwidth are the key parameters for budget loss analysis.

Analyze Fiber Optic Link Loss In The Design Stage
Prior to designing or installing a fiber optic system, a loss budget analysis is reccommended to make certain the system will work over the proposed link. Both the passive and active components of the circuit have to be included in the budget loss calculation. Passive loss is made up of fiber loss, connector loss, and splice loss. Don’t forget any couplers or splitters in the link. Active components are system gain, wavelength, transmitter power, receiver sensitivity, and dynamic range. Prior to system turn up, test the circuit with a source and FO power meter to ensure that it is within the loss budget.

The idea of a loss budget is to insure the network equipment will work over the installed fiber optic link. It is normal to be conservative over the specifications! Don’t use the best possible specs for fiber attenuation or connector loss – give yourself some margin!

The best way to illustrate calculating a loss budget is to show how it’s done for a 2 km multimode link with 5 connections (2 connectors at each end and 3 connections at fiber optic patch panels in the link) and one splice in the middle. See the drawings below of the link layout and the instantaneous power in the link at any point along it’s length, scaled exactly to the link drawing above it.

Fiber Optic Cable Plant Passive Component Loss

Step 1. Fiber loss at the operating wavelength

Cable Length 2.0 2.0
Fiber Type Multimode Singlemode
Wavelength (nm) 850 1300 1300 1550
Fiber Atten. dB/km 3 [3.5] 1 [1.5] 0.4 [1/0.5] 0.3 [1/0.5]
Total Fiber Loss 6.0 [7.0] 2.0 [3.0]

Step 2. Connector Loss
Multimode connectors will have losses of 0.2-0.5 dB typically. Singlemode connectors, which are factory made and fusion spliced on will have losses of 0.1-0.2 dB. Field terminated singlemode connectors may have losses as high as 0.5-1.0 dB. Let’s calculate it at both typical and worst case values.

Connector Loss 0.3 dB (typical adhesive/polish conn) 0.75 dB (TIA-568 max acceptable)
Total # of Connectors 5 5
Total Connector Loss 1.5 dB 3.75 dB

(All connectors are allowed 0.75 max per EIA/TIA 568 standard)

Step 3. Splice Loss
Multimode splices are usually made with mechanical splices, although some fusion splicing is used. The larger core and multiple layers make fusion splicing abut the same loss as mechanical splicing, but fusion is more reliable in adverse environments. Figure 0.1-0.5 dB for multimode splices, 0.3 being a good average for an experienced installer. Fusion splicing of singlemode fiber will typically have less than 0.05 dB (that’s right, less than a tenth of a dB!)

Typical Splice Loss 0.3 dB
Total # splices 1
Total Splice Loss 0.3 dB

(All splices are allowed 0.3 max per EIA/TIA 568 standard)

Step 4. Total Passive System Attenuation
Add the fiber loss, connector and splice losses to get the link loss.

Best Case TIA 568 Max
850 nm 1300 nm 850 nm 1300 nm
Total Fiber Loss (dB) 6.0 2.0 7.0 3.0
Total Connector Loss (dB) 1.5 1.5 3.75 3.75
Total Splice Loss (dB) 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3
Other (dB) 0 0 0 0
Total Link Loss (dB) 7.8 3.8 11.05 7.05

Remember these should be the criteria for testing. Allow +/- 0.2 -0.5 dB for measurement uncertainty and that becomes your pass/fail criterion.

Equipment Link Loss Budget Calculation: Link loss budget for network hardware depends on the dynamic range, the difference between the sensitivity of the receiver and the output of the source into the fiber. You need some margin for system degradation over time or environment, so subtract that margin (as much as 3dB) to get the loss budget for the link.

Step 5. Data From Manufacturer’s Specification for Active Components (Typical 100 Mb/s link)

Operating Wavelength (nm) 1300
Fiber Type MM
Receiver Sens. (dBm@ required BER) -31
Average Transmitter Output (dBm) -16
Dynamic Range (dB) 15
Recommended Excess Margin (dB) 3

Step 6. Loss Margin Calculation

Dynamic Range (dB) (above) 15 15
Cable Plant Link Loss (dB) 3.8 (Typ) 7.05 (TIA)
Link Loss Margin (dB) 11.2 7.95

As a general rule, the Link Loss Margin should be greater than approximately 3 dB to allow for link degradation over time. LEDs in the transmitter may age and lose power, connectors or splices may degrade or connectors may get dirty if opened for rerouting or testing. If cables are accidentally cut, excess margin will be needed to accommodate splices for restoration.

Source: http://www.jfiberoptic.com, fiber optic cables

Prysmian opens new fiber-optic cable plant in Romania

Cable maker Prysmian Group says it has a new fiber optic cable production facility at its campus in Slatina, Romania. The new production capability will triple the factory’s fiber-optic cable capacity to 1.5 million km, with the potential to reach 3 million km.

Prysmian manufactures energy cable and copper cable as well as fiber cable at the 40-year-old Slatina factory, one of 24 production facilities the company operates worldwide. The site began producing fiber optic cable in 2009. The plant comprises almost 100,000 m2 of space, 42,000 m2 of it covered, and employs more than 400 people.

“The investment in the new facility in Slatina is part of a major plan to further reinforce the Group’s competitiveness in this fast-changing market,” said Valerio Battista, CEO of the Prysmian Group. “Many developments are taking place in the current telecoms market. New players and services are appearing and evolution in broadband, double-play and triple-play services is dynamic. For this reason, as one of the major players in the telecom cable industry, Prysmian Group is continuously investing in this strategic sector in order to offer innovative technological solutions for the development of telecoms networks.”

Source from Jfiberoptic.com, China fiber optic cable manufacturer

Fiber becoming more accessible in data center networks

Data center networks have traditionally been built on a combination of structured cabling architectures, backhaul infrastructure and some point-to-point and top-of-rack cabling setups to support specific needs. This combination of cables can be extremely complex and often handles an incredibly large quantity of data. As traditional copper Ethernet cables used in many of these cabling topologies begin to struggle with bandwidth requirements, the need for fiber optic cables is increasing in the data center. According to Data Center Knowledge, advances in the fiber optic cabling sector are creating an environment in which optical network components are becoming more accessible.

The timing of advances in fiber could be perfect, as the rise of 10 Gbps, 40 Gbps and 100 Gbps network speeds could make fiber critical in a wide range of data centers. Fiber is not necessarily going to replace structured cables, as copper is able to handle 10 Gbps speeds and will likely be able to support 40 Gbps when the Category 8 standard is released. However, fiber may soon be necessary in the various interconnection points and backhaul setups within data centers.

The news source explained that pushable fiber is proving integral to helping data center managers take better advantage of optical network resources.

Understanding the advantage of pushable fiber
The article explained that pushable fiber is changing the way that data center managers install and manager optical components in the network. The combination of advanced microducts and better polymers in optical cables has created a dynamic in which fiber can be installed much more easily. In the past, fiber deployment required space in a specialized duct that protected the cables from being bent or having pressure exerted on them. New microducts provide the necessary protection and can be run through traditional cabling ducts. Furthermore, increasingly flexible fiber optic cables capable of a higher bend resistance are making installation a less strenuous activity.

According to the news source, many data center leaders have had to deal with costly projects to adjust network capacity. Innovation in pushable fiber is making many of those costs unnecessary by making it easier to integrate fiber with other parts of the configuration.

Fiber optic cabling has long had a reputation for offering incredible performance gains, but with high costs and major installation challenges. As the technology of the cables themselves has matured, many of these deployment and expense issues are receding, making the cabling format a much more accessible option in the data center.

Prysmian opens new fiber-optic cable plant in Romania

Cable maker Prysmian Group says it has a new fiber-optic cable production facility at its campus in Slatina, Romania. The new production capability will triple the factory’s fiber-optic cable capacity to 1.5 million km, with the potential to reach 3 million km.

Prysmian manufactures energy cable and copper cable as well as fiber cable at the 40-year-old Slatina factory, one of 24 production facilities the company operates worldwide. The site began producing fiber-optic cable in 2009. The plant comprises almost 100,000 m2 of space, 42,000 m2 of it covered, and employs more than 400 people.

“The investment in the new facility in Slatina is part of a major plan to further reinforce the Group’s competitiveness in this fast-changing market,” said Valerio Battista, CEO of the Prysmian Group. “Many developments are taking place in the current telecoms market. New players and services are appearing and evolution in broadband, double-play and triple-play services is dynamic. For this reason, as one of the major players in the telecom cable industry, Prysmian Group is continuously investing in this strategic sector in order to offer innovative technological solutions for the development of telecoms networks.”

How does a fiber optic cable work?

A fiber-optic cable is composed of many very thin strands of coated glass or plastic fibers that transmit light through the process of “cladding,” in which total internal reflection of light is achieved by using material that has a lower refractive index. Once light enters the fiber, the cladding layer inside it prevents light loss as the beam of light zigzags inside the glass core. Glass fibers can transmit messages or images by directing beams of light inside itself over very short or very long distances up to 13,000 miles (20,917 kilometers) without significant distortion. The pattern of light waves forms a code that carries a message. At the receiving end, the light beams are converted back into electric current and decoded. Uses include telecommunications medical fiber-optic viewers, such as endoscopes and fiberscopes, to see internal organs; fiber-optic message devices in aircraft and space vehicles; and fiber-optic connections in automotive lighting systems.

Fiber-optic cables have greater “bandwidth”: they can carry much more data than metal cable. Because fiber optics is based on light beams, the transmissions are more impervious to electrical noise and can also be carried greater distances before fading. The cables are thinner than metal wires. Fiber-optic cable delivers data in digital code instead of an analog signal, the delivery method of metal cables; computers are structured for digital, so there is a natural symbiosis. The main disadvantage is cost: fiber optics are much more expensive than traditional metal cable.

To understand how a fiber optic cable works, imagine an immensely long drinking straw or flexible plastic pipe. For example, imagine a pipe that is several miles long. Now imagine that the inside surface of the pipe has been coated with a perfect mirror. Now imagine that you are looking into one end of the pipe. Several miles away at the other end, a friend turns on a flashlight and shines it into the pipe. Because the interior of the pipe is a perfect mirror, the flashlight’s light will reflect off the sides of the pipe (even though the pipe may curve and twist) and you will see it at the other end. If your friend were to turn the flashlight on and off in a morse code fashion, your friend could communicate with you through the pipe. That is the essence of a fiber optic cable.

Related fiber optic cables – fiber optic patch cord, also called fiber optic patch cable, is a fiber optic cable terminated with fiber optic connectors on both ends. It has two major application areas: computer work station to outlet and fiber optic patch panels or optical cross connect distribution center. Fiber optic patch cables are for indoor applications only.