Tag Archives: cables

Disadvantages of Fiber Optics?

The science of fiber optics has its advantages and disadvantages. Though there are more advantages than disadvantages, they still are there. One of the largest disadvantages is the overall price of manufacturing and installation of the fiber optic system. Not only is a large amount of glass wire needed for one of these systems, but expensive transmitters and receivers are needed to move the data it carries. Setting up the wires and splicing them also comes at a large expense and also with a great degree of difficulty.

Related fiber optics products:
Fiber optical cables, fiber optic patch cord, fiber optic pigtail

Fiber becoming more accessible in data center networks

Data center networks have traditionally been built on a combination of structured cabling architectures, backhaul infrastructure and some point-to-point and top-of-rack cabling setups to support specific needs. This combination of cables can be extremely complex and often handles an incredibly large quantity of data. As traditional copper Ethernet cables used in many of these cabling topologies begin to struggle with bandwidth requirements, the need for fiber optic cables is increasing in the data center. According to Data Center Knowledge, advances in the fiber optic cabling sector are creating an environment in which optical network components are becoming more accessible.

The timing of advances in fiber could be perfect, as the rise of 10 Gbps, 40 Gbps and 100 Gbps network speeds could make fiber critical in a wide range of data centers. Fiber is not necessarily going to replace structured cables, as copper is able to handle 10 Gbps speeds and will likely be able to support 40 Gbps when the Category 8 standard is released. However, fiber may soon be necessary in the various interconnection points and backhaul setups within data centers.

The news source explained that pushable fiber is proving integral to helping data center managers take better advantage of optical network resources.

Understanding the advantage of pushable fiber
The article explained that pushable fiber is changing the way that data center managers install and manager optical components in the network. The combination of advanced microducts and better polymers in optical cables has created a dynamic in which fiber can be installed much more easily. In the past, fiber deployment required space in a specialized duct that protected the cables from being bent or having pressure exerted on them. New microducts provide the necessary protection and can be run through traditional cabling ducts. Furthermore, increasingly flexible fiber optic cables capable of a higher bend resistance are making installation a less strenuous activity.

According to the news source, many data center leaders have had to deal with costly projects to adjust network capacity. Innovation in pushable fiber is making many of those costs unnecessary by making it easier to integrate fiber with other parts of the configuration.

Fiber optic cabling has long had a reputation for offering incredible performance gains, but with high costs and major installation challenges. As the technology of the cables themselves has matured, many of these deployment and expense issues are receding, making the cabling format a much more accessible option in the data center.

What is the difference between a single mode and multi mode fiber optic connector?

There are 2 major differences one color code. single mode will be white or yellow. multimode will be black or tan. 2nd the hole in the connector ferrel for the fiber. fiber is 125 microns. in a single mode connector the opening is 126 microns. multimode is 127/128.
Single Mode cable is a single strand (most applications use 2 fibers) of glass fiber with a diameter of 8.3 to 10 microns that has one mode of transmission. Single Mode Fiber with a relatively narrow diameter, through which only one mode will propagate typically 1310 or 1550nm. Carries higher bandwidth than multimode fiber, but requires a light source with a narrow spectral width. Synonyms mono-mode optical fiber, single-mode fiber, single-mode optical waveguide, uni-mode fiber.
Single Modem fiber is used in many applications where data is sent at multi-frequency (WDM Wave-Division-Multiplexing) so only one cable is needed – (single-mode on one single fiber)
Single-mode fiber gives you a higher transmission rate and up to 50 times more distance than multimode, but it also costs more. Single-mode fiber has a much smaller core than multimode. The small core and single light-wave virtually eliminate any distortion that could result from overlapping light pulses, providing the least signal attenuation and the highest transmission speeds of any fiber cable type.

Single-mode optical fiber is an optical fiber in which only the lowest order bound mode can propagate at the wavelength of interest typically 1300 to 1320nm.
Multi-Mode cable has a little bit bigger diameter, with a common diameters in the 50-to-100 micron range for the light carry component (in the US the most common size is 62.5um). Most applications in which Multi-mode fiber is used, 2 fibers are used (WDM is not normally used on multi-mode fiber). POF is a newer plastic-based cable which promises performance similar to glass cable on very short runs, but at a lower cost.
Multimode fiber gives you high bandwidth at high speeds (10 to 100MBS – Gigabit to 275m to 2km) over medium distances. Light waves are dispersed into numerous paths, or modes, as they travel through the cable’s core typically 850 or 1300nm. Typical multimode fiber core diameters are 50, 62.5, and 100 micrometers. However, in long cable runs (greater than 3000 feet [914.4 meters), multiple paths of light can cause signal distortion at the receiving end, resulting in an unclear and incomplete data transmission so designers now call for single mode fiber in new applications using Gigabit and beyond.

Multimode& Singlemode fiber are the five types of fiber in common use. Both fibers are 125 microns in outside diameter – a micron is one one-millionth of a meter & 125 microns is 0.005 inches- a bit larger than the typical human hair. Multimode fiber has light travelling in the core in lots of rays, called modes. It’s a bigger core (always 62.5 microns, but sometimes 50 microns) & is used with LED sources at wavelengths of 850 & 1300 nm for slower local area networks (LANs) & lasers at 850 & 1310 nm for networks jogging at gigabits per second or more. Singlemode fiber has a much smaller core, only about 9 microns, so that the light travels in one ray. It is used for telephony & CATV with laser sources at 1300 & 1550 nm. Plastic Optical Fiber (POF) is large core (about 1mm) fiber that can only be used for short, low speed networks.
Step index multimode was the first fiber design but is slow for most makes use of, due to the dispersion caused by the different path lengths of the various modes. Step index fiber is rare – only POF makes use of a step index design today.
Graded index multimode fiber makes use of variations in the composition of the glass in the core to compensate for the different path lengths of the modes. It offers hundreds of times more bandwidth than step index fiber – up to about 2 gigahertz.
Singlemode fiber shrinks the core down so small that the light can only travel in one ray. This increases the bandwidth to infinity – but it is practically limited to about 100,000 gigahertz – that is still a lot!

Multimode& Singlemode fiber are the five types of fiber in common use. Both fibers are 125 microns in outside diameter – a micron is one one-millionth of a meter & 125 microns is 0.005 inches- a bit larger than the typical human hair. Multimode fiber has light travelling in the core in lots of rays, called modes. It’s a bigger core (always 62.5 microns, but sometimes 50 microns) & is used with LED sources at wavelengths of 850 & 1300 nm for slower local area networks (LANs) & lasers at 850 & 1310 nm for networks jogging at gigabits per second or more. Singlemode fiber has a much smaller core, only about 9 microns, so that the light travels in one ray. It is used for telephony & CATV with laser sources at 1300 & 1550 nm. Plastic Optical Fiber (POF) is large core (about 1mm) fiber that can only be used for short, low speed networks.
Step index multimode was the first fiber design but is slow for most makes use of, due to the dispersion caused by the different path lengths of the various modes. Step index fiber is rare – only POF makes use of a step index design today.
Graded index multimode fiber makes use of variations in the composition of the glass in the core to compensate for the different path lengths of the modes. It offers hundreds of times more bandwidth than step index fiber – up to about 2 gigahertz.
Singlemode fiber shrinks the core down so small that the light can only travel in one ray. This increases the bandwidth to infinity – but it is practically limited to about 100,000 gigahertz – that is still a lot!

Source: fiber cable manufacturer

Fiber Optic Patch Cable Buying Guide

Fiber optic patch cords are fiber optic cables used to attach one device to another for signal routing. It compresses in the entire electric network plank and room that wall plank and the flexibility cabinet needs. And today I would like to introduce you fiber optic patch cable.

fiber optic patch cable is with the fiber optic connectors, are upgrade version of the former MPO. MTP is with better mechanical and better performance compared with MPO. Both the MTP and MPO series cables are multi fiber connectors. There are many fiber optic channels in each single connector. Due to the feature of such multi fiber, these connectors need to use with multi fiber cables, especially the ribbon multi fiber optic cables.

Typical MTP/MPO fiber optic patch cord assemblies like MTP/MPO to 8 LC, MTP/MPO to 12 MT-RJ ,etc. Both single mode and multi-mode MPO ribbon patch cables are available and they are manufactured with various color-coded housings for easy identification. MPO fiber optic patch cord adopts precision molded MT ferrules, metal guide pins and appropriate housing to provide optical fiber alignment. The push-pull design is utilized for easy mating and removal.

MTP/MPO are usually used in ribbon fiber optic patch cords or ribbon fan out multi fiber assemblies. Made by multi-fiber ribbon materials, the MPO ribbon patch cable is an ideal connecting tool for telecommunication system, testing instruments, LAN and WAN systems, FTTX, etc. The MPO ribbon patch cable features removable housing, allowing easy replacement of pin clamps, ferrule clearing and connector repolishing. Connection integrity is assured by the spring-action side latch housing. The ribbon fiber optic cables features multi fiberglass inside each single jacket ,MTP/MPO are also multi fiberglass core inside each single connector, which means, there are several fiberglass connections in each single MTP/MPO fiber optic patch cord.

Jiafu fiber optic cable manufactures a full line of fiber optic patch cables. There are LC, SC, ST, FC, E2000, E2000, DIN, D4, SMA and DIN Fiber Optic Patch Cables, which classified by connector types. In addition to standard patch cords, JiaFu also provides several kinds of specialty patch cords, such as ribbon fan-out cords, MTP / MPO patch cords, mode conditioning patch cords, armored patch cord and water proof pigtails.

Through there are so many types of fiber optic patch cords, I am going to suggest you a buying guide to helping you select the correct fiber patch cable that meets your demand.

1.Choose fiber optic connectors ST, SC, LC, FC, SC/APC, LC/APC, FC/APC, FDDI, SMA, MTP, MPO, MTP/APC, MPO/APC.

2.Choose Fiber Mode, Single Mode 9/125µm OS1, Multimode 62.5/125µm OM1, Multimode 50/125µm OM2, Multimode 50/125µm OM3 10Gigabit, Multimode 50/125µm OM4, Multimode 100/140, Multimode, 200/230.

3.Choose Fiber Cable Construction Type, Simplex fiber optic cable (A single fiber), Duplex fiber optic cable (2 fibers in a single cable, Zip Cord), Multi-Fiber cables, custom configurations, common are 4 fiber, 6fiber, 8fiber, 12 fiber, 24 fiber, 48 fiber, 72 fiber, 144 fiber, 256 fiber. Higher fiber counts are normally terminated as a MTP/MPO Trunk cables, using MTP/MPO connectors.

4.Choose Fiber Cable Diameter, In stock/Most common are 3.0mm Jacket OD. Optional are 2.0mm, 1.8mm, 1.6mm.

5.Choose Fiber Optic Cable Jacket Color. Industry Standard fiber optic cable jacket colors are. SM Yellow, MM 62.5 Orange, MM 50 OM2 Orange, MM 50 10Gb OM3 Aqua/Light Blue, Optional are Blue, Orange, Green Brown, Gray/Slate, White, Red, Black, Yellow, Purple, Pink, Aqua.

6.Choose Jacket material type, PVC jacket, Riser jacket, Plenum Jacket, Armored Jacket.

7.Choose fiber patch cord length option, normally measured in Meters. Optional lengths, CM, mm, Inches, Foot, KM, Mile.

The Difference Between Single Mode & Multimode Fiber Optic Connectors

Fiber optic cables are used in data communications such as telephone lines, cable television and broadband Internet. The cables consist of flexible transparent glass fibers that are connected to electronic devices with modulators. The modulators receive data from the sending device and encode it into light pulses made by LED transmitters in the cable connection. The LED sends the encoded light pulses from one end of the fiber to the other. At the other end of the cable, the light pulses are sent into a detector that converts the data back into it original format before sending it to the receiving device.

Fiber-Optic Connectors

Fiber-optic cables are connected with special connectors or spliced together. Fiber-optic connectors consist of a ferrule, a connector body and a coupling mechanism. The ferrule is a thin cylinder that holds the optic fiber in its hollowed-out center. Fiber-optic connectors can be made out of metal, plastic or ceramic. The connector body is made of plastic or metal. It holds the ferrule and connects to the outer jacket of the cable. The coupling mechanism is the body that holds the connector in place when it is attached to an electronics device. Fiber-optic connectors can be a push-and-click latch clip, a screw-in connector or a turn-and-latch bayonet-style nut connector.

Single Mode and Multimode

The mode of a fiber-optic cable is the path that data or light signals travel through. The core diameter of a multimode-fiber-optic cable is larger than a single-mode-fiber-optic cable. Single-mode cables allow a single wavelength and path for light to travel; multimode fiber is used to patch cable to a desktop or a patch panel to computers or televisions.

Single Mode Connectors

Single-mode connector boots are blue or white. The ferrule of the connector is often made out of zirconia, a type of ceramic. The single-mode ferrule has a smaller hole than the multimode ferrrule, which is not detectable by the naked eye.

Multimode Connectors

Multimode-connector boots are beige or black. The boot is the part of the connector that is covered by a sleeve where the fiber-optic cable ends. The ferrule of a multimode connector can be made out of stainless steel, plastic comp. osite or ceramic zirconia.